Hotspots of nitrogen deposition in the world’s urban areas: a global data synthesis
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Hotspots of nitrogen deposition in the world’s urban areas: a global data synthesis

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  • Journal Title:
    Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment
  • Description:
    Human activities have altered the global nitrogen (N) cycle, elevating rates of atmospheric N deposition up to tenfold above pre-industrial levels, with consequences for ecosystem function and human health. To date, most N deposition studies have been carried out in rural areas; however, there has been a recent surge of N deposition studies conducted in urban ecosystems due to the increased recognition that humans are greatly altering the N cycle in these environments. We synthesized data from 174 publications over a period of 40 years that examined rates of N deposition in urban and nearby rural areas worldwide. Results of this meta-analysis help to quantify urban N deposition, demonstrate that total N deposition in cities is predominately composed of chemically reduced – as opposed to oxidized – forms of N like ammonia, and identify regional hotspots of urban N deposition, particularly in China. These findings highlight the need to examine and address the N cycle in cities as the world continues to urbanize.
  • Source:
    Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 18(2):92-100
  • Document Type:
  • Rights Information:
    CC BY
  • Compliance:
    Submitted
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