Submarine Groundwater Discharge (SGD) to Coastal Waters of Saipan (Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, USA): Implications for Nitrogen Sources, Transport and Ecological Effects
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.

Search our Collections & Repository

All these words:

For very narrow results

This exact word or phrase:

When looking for a specific result

Any of these words:

Best used for discovery & interchangable words

None of these words:

Recommended to be used in conjunction with other fields

Language:

Dates

Publication Date Range:

to

Document Data

Title:

Document Type:

Library

Collection:

Series:

People

Author:

Help
Clear All

Query Builder

Query box

Help
Clear All

For additional assistance using the Custom Query please check out our Help Page

i

Submarine Groundwater Discharge (SGD) to Coastal Waters of Saipan (Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, USA): Implications for Nitrogen Sources, Transport and Ecological Effects

Filetype[PDF-1.28 MB]



Details:

  • Journal Title:
    Water
  • Description:
    Seagrass meadows and coral reefs along the coast of Saipan, a US commonwealth in the Northern Pacific, have been declining since the 1940s, possibly due to nutrient loading. This study investigated whether submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) contributes to nutrient loading and supports primary production on Saipan’s coast. SGD can be an important source of freshwater, nutrients, and other pollutants to coastal waters, especially in oceanic islands without well-developed stream systems. Ra and Rn isotopes were used as natural tracers of SGD. Nitrate, phosphate, and ammonium concentrations, ancillary water quality parameters, δ15N and δ18O of dissolved nitrate, and δ15N of primary producer tissue were measured. Our results pointed to discharge of low-salinity groundwater containing elevated concentrations of sewage-derived N at specific locations along Saipan’s coast. High SGD areas had lower salinity and pH, higher dissolved inorganic nitrogen concentrations, and elevated primary producer δ15N, indicative of sewage nitrogen inputs. We estimated that SGD could support 730–6400 and 3000–15,000 mol C d−1 of primary production in Tanapag and Garapan Lagoons, respectively, or up to approximately 60% of primary production in Garapan Lagoon. Efforts to improve water quality, reduce nutrient loading, and preserve coastal ecosystems must account for groundwater, since our results demonstrate that it is an important pathway of nitrogen delivery.
  • Source:
    Water 2020, 12(11), 3029
  • Document Type:
  • Rights Information:
    CC BY
  • Compliance:
    Submitted
  • Main Document Checksum:
  • File Type:

Supporting Files

More +

You May Also Like

Checkout today's featured content at repository.library.noaa.gov

Version 3.20