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The effect of ocean warming on black sea bass (Centropristis striata) aerobic scope and hypoxia tolerance
  • Published Date:
    2019
  • Source:
    PLOS ONE, 14(6), 22
Filetype[PDF-1.91 MB]


Details:
  • Alternative Title:
    The effect of ocean warming on black sea bass (Centropristis striata) aerobic scope and hypoxia tolerance
  • Description:
    Over the last decade, ocean temperature on the U.S. Northeast Continental Shelf (U.S. NES) has warmed faster than the global average and is associated with observed distribution changes of the northern stock of black sea bass (Centropristis striata). Mechanistic models based on physiological responses to environmental conditions can improve future habitat suitability projections. We measured maximum, standard metabolic rate, and hypoxia tolerance (S-crit) of the northern adult black sea bass stock to assess performance across the known temperature range of the species. Two methods, chase and swim-flume, were employed to obtain maximum metabolic rate to examine whether the methods varied, and if so, the impact on absolute aerobic scope. A subset of individuals was held at 30 degrees C for one month (30(chronic) degrees C) prior to experiments to test acclimation potential. Absolute aerobic scope (maximum-standard metabolic rate) reached a maximum of 367.21 mgO(2) kg(-1) hr(-1) at 24.4 degrees C while S-crit continued to increase in proportion to standard metabolic rate up to 30 degrees C. The 30(chronic) degrees C group exhibited a significantly lower maximum metabolic rate and absolute aerobic scope in relation to the short-term acclimated group, but standard metabolic rate or S-crit were not affected. This suggests a decline in performance of oxygen demand processes (e.g. muscle contraction) beyond 24 degrees C despite maintenance of oxygen supply. The Metabolic Index, calculated from S-crit as an estimate of potential aerobic scope, closely matched the measured factorial aerobic scope (maximum / standard metabolic rate) and declined with increasing temperature to a minimum below 3. This may represent a critical threshold value for the species. With temperatures on the U.S. NES projected to increase above 24 degrees C in the next 80-years in the southern portion of the northern stock's range, it is likely black sea bass range will continue to shift poleward as the ocean continues to warm.
  • DOI:
    10.1371/journal.pone.0218390
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC6564031
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