| Pollution in surface sediments in Faga'alu Bay, Tutuila, American Samoa - :16193 | National Ocean Service (NOS)
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Pollution in surface sediments in Faga'alu Bay, Tutuila, American Samoa
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    "This document presents environmental data collected in 2014 on surface sediment contamination in Faga'alu Bay on the island of Tutuila, American Samoa (Figure 1). These data are part of a larger interdisciplinary baseline assessment effort which included: biological assessments, stream nutrient and sediment loading, and physical oceanography. Collaborators for this larger effort included: San Diego State University, USGS, NOAA's Coral Reef Ecosystem Division, NOAA's National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and NOAA's Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP). CRCP coordinated and funded this effort to gather baseline data and information in Faga'alu before a management intervention was implemented to reduce land-based sources of pollution. To carry out these baseline assessments, experts from across NOAA were asked to apply their knowledge and technical skills to develop baseline information to share with the local management authorities in American Samoa so that the effectiveness of the intervention could be determined. The activities undertaken thus far represent the short-term baseline data collection and interpretation needed up front in order to determine the effectiveness of the intervention over the long term. In order to understand the effectiveness of the intervention, long-term monitoring will be required and the data from that monitoring will be compared to these baselines. This work represents the pre-intervention baseline data collection, analysis and interpretation needed for future evaluation of the effectiveness of the mitigation actions taken. Ongoing long-term monitoring should transition into the hands of the local management authorities."--Page 1. [doi:10.7289/V5/TM-NOS-NCCOS-201 (https://doi.org/10.7289/V5/TM-NOS-NCCOS-201)]

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