| Representing Multiple Scales in the Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting Modeling System: Design of Multiple Sets of Movable Multilevel Nesting and the Basin-Scale HWRF Forecast Application - :16186 | Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) | National Weather Service (NWS)
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Representing Multiple Scales in the Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting Modeling System: Design of Multiple Sets of Movable Multilevel Nesting and the Basin-Scale HWRF Forecast Application
  • Published Date:
    2016
  • Source:
    Weather and Forecasting, 31(6), 2019-2034.
Filetype[PDF-2.91 MB]


Details:
  • Description:
    In this study, the design of movable multilevel nesting (MMLN) in the Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting (HWRF) modeling system is documented. The configuration of a new experimental HWRF system with a much larger horizontal outer domain and multiple sets of MMLN, referred to as the "basin scale" HWRF, is also described. The performance of this new system is applied for various difficult forecast scenarios such as 1) simulating multiple storms [i.e., Hurricanes Earl (2010), Danielle (2010), and Frank (2010)] and 2) forecasting tropical cyclone (TC) to extratropical cyclone transitions, specifically Hurricane Sandy (2012). Verification of track forecasts for the 2011-14 Atlantic and eastern Pacific hurricane seasons demonstrates that the basin-scale HWRF produces similar overall results to the 2014 operational HWRF, the best operational HWRF at the same resolution. In the Atlantic, intensity forecasts for the basin-scale HWRF were notably worse than for the 2014 operational HWRF, but this deficiency was shown to be from poor intensity forecasts for Hurricane Leslie (2012) associated with the lack of ocean coupling in the basin-scale HWRF. With Leslie removed, the intensity forecast errors were equivalent. The basin-scale HWRF is capable of predicting multiple TCs simultaneously, allowing more realistic storm-to-storm interactions. Even though the basin-scale HWRF produced results only comparable to the regular operational HWRF at this stage, this configuration paves a promising pathway toward operations.

  • Document Type:
  • Funding:
    Grant No: NA12NWS4680007
    Grant No: NA13OAR4830232
    Grant No: NA14OAR4830119
  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files
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