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Present abundance of Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) in the U.S.S.R
  • Published Date:
    1991
Filetype[PDF - 746.72 KB]


Details:
  • Personal Authors:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Alaska Fisheries Science Center (U.S.)
  • Series:
    AFSC processed report ; 91-14
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    In the Soviet Union, Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus) are found in the Okhotsk Sea, Bering Sea, and north into the Chukchi Sea (Krasheninnikov 1949; Nikulin L937; Tikhornirov 1964; Perlov 1983). The largest group of these sea lions is concentrated on five of the Kuril Islands; a smaller grouping occurs near eastern Kamchatka and north along the Koriak coast. Small sea lion rookeries occur on the Commander Islands, and on Iony and lamskie Islands in the okhotsk Sea. Haul-out sites occur near Hokkaido at LaPerouse Strait (Opasnosti Rock) and on Tyuteniy Island (Robben Island) near Sakhalin. During the history of sea lion research in the Soviet Union, there has never been an estimate of the total population abundance for any given year. All abundance estimates are rough approximations and based on estimates obtained during different years. AIso, the historical data were sometimes incomplete. In 1966, nearly 35,000 sea lions were estimated to inhabit the Kuril Islands, Commander Islands, Iony Island, and Kamchatka area (Marakov L9661. Subsequent analysis of published information and inquiries to loca1 authorities led me to reduce this estimate to 26,OOO Steller sea lions, including animals in the Bering Sea (Pertov L975). Part of the reduction was based on the consideration that Marakov's estimate was too high (Perlov 1977) since the amount of information available for the Kamchatka Coast was minimal.