| International Workshop on the Trade in Coral Reef Species : development of international guidelines for environmentally friendly coral mariculture - :981 | Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) | National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)
Stacks Logo
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.
 
 
Help
Clear All Simple Search
Advanced Search
International Workshop on the Trade in Coral Reef Species : development of international guidelines for environmentally friendly coral mariculture
  • Published Date:
    2012
Filetype[PDF-7.95 MB]


This document cannot be previewed automatically as it exceeds 5 MB
Please click the thumbnail image to view the document.
International Workshop on the Trade in Coral Reef Species : development of international guidelines for environmentally friendly coral mariculture
Details:
  • Personal Authors:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Coral Reef Conservation Program (U.S.) ; Ocean Foundation ; Yayasan Alam Indonesia Lestari (LINI)
  • Conference Authors:
    International Workshop on the Trade in Coral Reef Species (2011 : Bali, Indonesia),
  • Description:
    "Since the late 1980's, the trade in stony corals has increased by 300% with around one million corals in trade each year. Most live coral is currently exported from Indonesia, followed by Fiji, Vietnam and several other South Pacific island nations (Rhyne et al. 2012). In 2004, over one million live corals were harvested from the wild for the aquarium trade (and over 2000 tons of live rock as well as 100's of tons of corals that are killed and bleached for the curio trade, Rhyne et al. 2012). The United States is the world's largest consumer, buying more than 80% of corals and other reef invertebrates. However, commercial extraction of coral is banned in the United States. Although the volume continues to increase, much of this is through mariculture (Rhyne and Tlusty 2012). Many of the branching corals are now being propagated from fragments on farms in developing countries, as well as land based farms in the United States and Europe and in hobbyist aquaria. The growth of maricultured corals is noticeable in Indonesia which has established an annual quota of about 500,000 pieces. This will help preserve extant coral reefs as it will significantly reduce the removal or corals from the wild.

  • Document Type:
  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files
No Related Documents.
You May Also Like: