| Climate prediction S&T digest : NWS science & technology infusion climate bulletin supplement - :9380 | National Weather Service (NWS)
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Climate prediction S&T digest : NWS science & technology infusion climate bulletin supplement
  • Published Date:
    2011
Filetype[PDF - 27.52 MB]


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Climate prediction S&T digest : NWS science & technology infusion climate bulletin supplement
Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    United States, National Weather Service., Office of Science and Technology Integration, ; Climate Prediction Center (U.S.) ;
  • Conference Authors:
    Climate Diagnostics and Prediction Workshop 2011 : Fort Worth, Tex.),
  • Description:
    "The 36th Climate Diagnostics and Prediction Workshop was held in Fort Worth, Texas, on 3-6 October 2011. The workshop was hosted by the National Weather Service (NWS) Southern Region Headquarters and the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), and cosponsored by the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction and NWS Climate Services Division. The American Meteorological Society was a cooperating sponsor. A diverse group of about 132 scientists from more than 70 domestic and international institutes gathered to explore current operational climate prediction capabilities, identify opportunities for advances, and discuss new products needed to support regional decision makers. The workshop addressed the status and prospects for advancing climate monitoring, assessment, and prediction with emphasis in five major themes: 1. Changes in weather and climate extremes on timescales from daily to decadal; 2. Performance of NOAA coupled models on timescales from daily to decadal, including reanalysis, reforecasts and multi-model ensembles; 3. Status and prospects for improved understanding and more realistic simulation and prediction of drought/pluvial, including objective drought tools and impacts on water resources; 4. Prospects for improved understanding and prediction of warm season North American hydroclimate variability; 5. Development and delivery of climate information that meets the evolving needs of users, including business, government, resource managers, scientists, sectoral stakeholders, and private citizens. This Workshop is continuing to grow and provides a stimulus for further improvements in climate prediction, monitoring, diagnostics, applications and services"--Overview.

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