| An acoustic survey of grouper sound production at Riley's Hump, Torgugas South Ecological Reserve - :738 | Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP)
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An acoustic survey of grouper sound production at Riley's Hump, Torgugas South Ecological Reserve
  • Published Date:
Filetype[PDF-4.38 MB]

  • Corporate Authors:
    Coral Reef Conservation Program (U.S.)
  • Description:
    "Long-term passive acoustic recorders were used to monitor s pawning habitat use by grouper on Riley's Hump, a fish aggregation site located within the Tortugas South Ecological Reserve. Recordings were made at 10 minute intervals at up to seven sites during portions of 2010-2012. Six recording sites were located on Riley's Hump proper in approximately 30 meter depths and a single site was located in deeper adjacent water of 58 meters. Audio/video recorders were deployed overnight at some sites during research cruises in the winter/spring to help identify sources of sound. Sound production of red grouper and red hind were recorded year round and at all times of the circadian day, but were most abundant near nightfall during the winter/spring spawning period. These patterns are consistent with results of previous studies which documented the use of sound production association with reproductive behavior at spawning sites. Evidence of sound production by black grouper was also recorded and identified with video. Black grouper produced at least two variations of a low frequency, modulated tonal call which ranged between 60-120 Hz, lasted on average 5.2 seconds and reached 154-159 dB SPL (re:1 u Pa). Grouper sound production was concentrated in the frequency range of <200 Hz. Distinct diel and seasonal patterns in sound production were also evident in the 300-400 and 600-800 Hz range but sources of sound production in these frequency ranges were not identified. The results of this study demonstrate that red grouper, black grouper, and red hind use Riley's Hump as spawning habitat"--Abstract.

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