| The 10 January 2011 southeast ice storm : evaluating ageostrophic contributions to boundary layer thermal balance, surface winds and temperature advection to anticipate cold air damming evolution and predict precipitation type - :6930 | National Weather Service (NWS)
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The 10 January 2011 southeast ice storm : evaluating ageostrophic contributions to boundary layer thermal balance, surface winds and temperature advection to anticipate cold air damming evolution and predict precipitation type
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    During the morning of 10 January 2011 an ice storm affected most of the National Weather Service (NWS) Charleston, South Carolina (SC) forecast area. This event featured a cold air damming (CAD) regime marked by a strong surface high pressure and a dry, cold air mass with boundary layer wet bulb temperatures at or below 0° C. Freezing rain developed as warm, moist air was forced above this environment. Advection of cold, dry air sustained boundary layer evaporational cooling and outweighed warming processes produced by the moderate to heavy freezing rain, which supported a period of rapid ice accretion on exposed surfaces at all but the far southern locales of the NWS Charleston, SC forecast area. Numerical model forecasts of this CAD event and associated rapid ice accretion proved accurate across most inland counties of the NWS Charleston, SC forecast area. Across coastal and southern counties of the NWS Charleston, SC forecast area, model guidance prior to the onset of precipitation depicted erosion of the periphery of the CAD regime by a combination of processes including inland penetration of the coastal front, changing any freezing precipitation initially supported by evaporational cooling to warm rain before major travel impacts occurred. Indeed, this scenario conforms to climatology and was assigned a high probability of occurrence by objective guidance and operational forecasters.

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