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Using computer software to analyze climatological data for an interdisciplinary meteorological study
  • Published Date:
    1995
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Using computer software to analyze climatological data for an interdisciplinary meteorological study
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  • Corporate Authors:
    United States, National Weather Service,
  • Description:
    "The purpose of this study is to illustrate how the current generation of computers, software, and data availability can help expand the horizons of the modernized National Weather Service (NWS) to meet the needs of a changing world. As pollution concentrations rise to harmful levels over large metropolitan areas, and nuclear energy sources continue to meet resistance from the public, other non-polluting energy solutions are actively being sought (Schaeffer et al., 1994). Solar power has been noted as a pollution-free and renewable energy resource for decades, but thus far has not had wide spread use across the United States. The best locations for installing solar power energy systems lie within the 'sunbelt' that encompasses the southern tier of states (Schaeffer et al. 1994). However, a question arises as to whether the northern areas of the United States, where long winters and cool summers are predominate, are out of the realm of possibility for solar power applications. By using the National Climatic Data Center's (NCDC) Solar and Meteorological Surface Observation Network (SAMSON)data available on CD-ROM, Quattro Pro software (Campbell 1993), and the Statistical COrrelation and REgression (SCORE) program (Wooldridge and Burrus 1995), an analysis of the climate of Binghamton, NY, and a numerical simulation of a hypothetical solar power energy system was conducted to assess the potential for solar energy applications in the Binghamton area. Although this study focuses specifically on Binghamton, NY, the approach employed is not site-specific and can be utilized for any location where solar applications are being considered"--Introduction.

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