Footprint, weathering, and persistence of synthetic-base drilling mud olefins in deep-sea sediments following the Deepwater Horizon disaster
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Footprint, weathering, and persistence of synthetic-base drilling mud olefins in deep-sea sediments following the Deepwater Horizon disaster

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Details:

  • Journal Title:
    Marine Pollution Bulletin
  • NOAA Program & Office:
  • Description:
    Olefin-based synthetic-based drilling mud (SBM) was released into the Gulf of Mexico as a result of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) disaster in 2010. We studied the composition of neat SBM and, using conventional GC-FID, the extent, concentration, and chemical character of SBM-derived olefins in > 3600 seafloor sediments collected in 2010/2011 and 2014. SBM-derived (C14–C20) olefins occurred (up to 10 cm deep) within a 6.5 km2 “footprint” around the well. The olefin concentration in most sediments decreased an order of magnitude between 2010/2011 and 2014, at least in part due to biodegradation, evidenced by the preferential loss C16 and C18 linear (α- and internal) versus branched olefins. Based on their persistence for 4-years in sediments around the Macondo well, and 13-years near a former unrelated drill site (~ 62 km away), weathered SBM-derived olefins released during the DWH disaster are anticipated to persist in deep-sea sediment for (at least) a comparable duration.
  • Source:
    Marine Pollution Bulletin, 118(1-2), 328-340
  • ISSN:
    0025-326X
  • Format:
  • Publisher:
  • Document Type:
  • Rights Information:
    Accepted Manuscript
  • Compliance:
    Library
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