Anchoring on visual cues in a stated preference survey: The case of siting offshore wind power projects
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Anchoring on visual cues in a stated preference survey: The case of siting offshore wind power projects

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  • Journal Title:
    Journal of Choice Modelling
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  • Description:
    We consider anchoring on visual cues in a contingent-behavior study of the effects of offshore wind power projects on beach use on the East Coast of the United States. In an internet-based survey of beachgoers, we show respondents visual simulations of wind power projects at three offshore distances and vary the order in which respondents see the visuals -- so some see near visuals first and some see far visuals first. Respondents are asked how their trip-taking behavior may be affected by the projects. In parametric and non-parametric analyses, we find strong anchoring in the far-to-near ordering of the visuals and weak anchoring in the near-to-far ordering. We also find greater dependence on the first-shown visual versus the most-recent-shown visual. Finally, we find some effects of having viewed wind turbines in real life before entering the survey. The size of the anchoring effect has important policy implications insofar as it affects the predicted change in visitation and hence measured impact of offshore wind power projects. It also has implications for the interpretation of results from other stated preference surveys using visuals and on how surveys are designed.
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    Journal of Choice Modelling, 38, 100264
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  • ISSN:
    1755-5345
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    Accepted Manuscript
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    Library
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