Mercury offloading in gametes and potential adverse effects of high mercury concentrations in blood and tissues of Atlantic Goliath Grouper Epinephelus itajara in the southeastern United States
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.

Search our Collections & Repository

For very narrow results

When looking for a specific result

Best used for discovery & interchangable words

Recommended to be used in conjunction with other fields

Dates

to

Document Data
Library
People
Clear All
Clear All

For additional assistance using the Custom Query please check out our Help Page

i

Mercury offloading in gametes and potential adverse effects of high mercury concentrations in blood and tissues of Atlantic Goliath Grouper Epinephelus itajara in the southeastern United States

Filetype[PDF-1.19 MB]



Details:

  • Journal Title:
    Science of The Total Environment
  • Personal Author:
  • NOAA Program & Office:
  • Description:
    Mercury (Hg) is a ubiquitous and non-essential heavy metal that is highly toxic to aquatic organisms. Few studies examine Hg and its effects on wild fish populations. Here, we investigated the potential effects of Hg exposure on a large and long-lived marine species of conservation concern, the vulnerable Atlantic Goliath Grouper Epinephelus itajara. Our objectives were (1) to measure Hg (methyl-Hg; and total Hg = combined methyl-Hg and inorganic-Hg) concentrations in whole blood (WB) and gametes (eggs and sperm); (2) to investigate the relationships between Hg concentrations in muscle and liver with WB and gametes; (3) to investigate the relationships between Hg concentrations in liver, muscle, and WB with hematological and plasma biochemical analytes; and (4) to investigate the relationship between liver Hg and pigmented macrophage aggregates in liver tissue sections. We found several lines of evidence for potential adverse effects on Goliath Grouper health and reproduction by high Hg concentrations in liver, muscle, WB, and gametes, including (1) Hg concentrations in all tissues and gametes were well above observable ranges of marine and freshwater fishes from experimental exposure studies; (2) gamete Hg concentrations were among the highest recorded in wild fishes, with seasonal patterns suggesting females offload significant amounts of Hg into their eggs during the spawning season; (3) Methyl-Hg was highest in muscle, followed by sperm, liver, eggs, and WB; (4) there were significant correlations between liver, muscle, and WB Hg concentrations with various blood analytes; (5) vitellogenin positively correlated with female liver methyl-Hg concentrations, and was abnormally high in males, suggesting direct endocrine effects; and (6) liver total Hg positively correlated with pigmented macrophage aggregate count and percent area. This work will help guide future research examining the potential adverse effects of Hg and its role as an additional stressor on wild fish populations.
  • Keywords:
  • Source:
    Science of The Total Environment, 779, 146437
  • DOI:
  • ISSN:
    0048-9697
  • Format:
  • Publisher:
  • Document Type:
  • Funding:
  • Rights Information:
    Accepted Manuscript
  • Compliance:
    Library
  • Main Document Checksum:
  • Download URL:
  • File Type:

Supporting Files

  • No Additional Files
More +

You May Also Like

Checkout today's featured content at repository.library.noaa.gov

Version 3.26.1