What does the public think about farming seafood? Modeling predictors of social support for aquaculture development in the U.S.
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What does the public think about farming seafood? Modeling predictors of social support for aquaculture development in the U.S.

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  • Journal Title:
    Ocean & Coastal Management
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  • Description:
    Understanding the factors that increase or decrease the likelihood for public support of aquaculture is critical for it to achieve its social sustainability prospects. Previous studies across the globe have identified a series of indicators linked to public support for aquaculture. We tested their validity with a national US sample and found that most were consistent with previous findings; participants who have pro-environmental views, recognize environmental benefits of aquaculture, believe that aquaculture is a source of good jobs, are more trusting of government officials, are more knowledgeable about aquaculture, eat more farmed seafood and believe that farmed seafood is safer than wild caught are more likely to support aquaculture development. Counter to our hypothesis, perceptions of use-conflict were not related to support for aquaculture. Using General Structural Equation Modeling statistical techniques, we expand on these findings to assess how individual demographic characteristics influence support directly and indirectly through our perception variables positioned as mediators. Analysis revealed that demographic characteristics influence support primarily through indirect pathways.
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    Ocean & Coastal Management, 226, 106279
  • DOI:
  • ISSN:
    0964-5691
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    Accepted Manuscript
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    Library
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