Bleaching, mortality and lengthy recovery on the coral reefs of Lord Howe Island. The 2019 marine heatwave suggests an uncertain future for high-latitude ecosystems
Advanced Search
Select up to three search categories and corresponding keywords using the fields to the right. Refer to the Help section for more detailed instructions.

Search our Collections & Repository

For very narrow results

When looking for a specific result

Best used for discovery & interchangable words

Recommended to be used in conjunction with other fields

Dates

to

Document Data
Library
People
Clear All
Clear All

For additional assistance using the Custom Query please check out our Help Page

i

Bleaching, mortality and lengthy recovery on the coral reefs of Lord Howe Island. The 2019 marine heatwave suggests an uncertain future for high-latitude ecosystems

Filetype[PDF-1.96 MB]



Details:

  • Journal Title:
    PLOS Climate
  • Personal Author:
  • NOAA Program & Office:
  • Description:
    Oceanic thermal anomalies are increasing in both frequency and strength, causing detrimental impacts to coral reef communities. Water temperatures beyond the corals optimum threshold causeing coral bleaching and mass mortality, impacting our global coral reef ecosystems, including marginal high-latitude reefs. Coral bleaching and mortality were observed at the southernmost coral reef, Lord Howe Island Marine Park, during the summer of 2019, coinciding with anomalously high sea surface temperatures across the reef system from January-April. Here we document the extent of coral impacts within the Lord Howe Island lagoonal reef and the recovery from bleaching eight-months later. Significant differences in bleaching prevalence were observed across the lagoonal coral reef, ranging from 16 to 83% across offshore and inshore reef regions and with variable onset timing. Coral mortality of up to 40% was recorded in the reef’s most severely impacted near-shore area. The four most dominant species, Stylophora pistillata, Pocillopora damicornis, Porites spp. and Seriatopora hystrix, were the most susceptible to bleaching, with all coral colonies found either bleached or dead at the most affected inshore site during and following peak heat stress. Interestingly, during the eight-months following bleaching, there was no evidence of bleaching recovery (i.e., re-establishment of symbiosis) at the offshore lagoonal site. However, there was a significant increase in the abundance of healthy coral colonies at the inshore site, suggesting the recovery of the surviving bleached corals at this site. Importantly, we found no evidence for bleaching or mortality in the Acropora spp. and minimal bleaching and no mortality in Isopora cuneata during the study period, typically highly susceptible species. Given the isolation of high-latitude reefs such as Lord Howe Island, our results highlight the importance of understanding the impacts of bleaching, mortality and bleaching recovery on coral population structure and resilience of high-latitude coral reefs.
  • Source:
    PLOS Climate, 2(4), e0000080
  • DOI:
  • ISSN:
    2767-3200
  • Format:
  • Publisher:
  • Document Type:
  • License:
  • Rights Information:
    CC BY
  • Compliance:
    Library
  • Main Document Checksum:
  • Download URL:
  • File Type:

You May Also Like

Checkout today's featured content at repository.library.noaa.gov

Version 3.26.1