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Spillover effects of environmental regulation for sea turtle protection the case of the Hawaii shallow-set longline fishery
  • Published Date:
    2012
Filetype[PDF - 1.34 MB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (U.S.)
  • Series:
    NOAA technical memorandum NMFS-PIFSC ; 30
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    The study examines whether, and to what extent, U.S. fishing limits instituted to protect endangered species can cause changes in foreign fleet activity that ultimately have adverse effects on the very species intended for protection. To protect sea turtles, federal fishery managers established a regulatory regime that resulted in a temporary closure of the Hawaii swordfish (shallow-set longline) fishery during 2001-2004 and the establishment of annual fishing effort limits and annual sea turtles interaction caps when the fishery was reopened. The globalized (pelagic) resources of swordfish and sea turtles allow for 'spillover effects': when one fishery reduces activity, other fisheries may increase activity to satisfy the unmet demand, and vice versa. This study provides a quantified estimate of the possible spillover effects resulting from the aforementioned regulations based on 2 perspectives. First, this study estimates the spillover effect resulting from market replacement as U.S. swordfish consumption shifts from domestic production to foreign imports as a result of the domestic fishery closure. Because U.S. swordfish imports are harvested in different oceans by different countries, the spillover effects are estimated on a global scale (the sum across all oceans). Subsequently, this study estimates the spillover effects resulting from the displacement of production by the competitors in the specific ocean area where the Hawaii shallow-set longline fishery for swordfish operates. The study found strong spillover (market transfer) effects from regulation of the Hawaii shallow-set longline fishery for swordfish, resulting in more sea turtle bycatch as Hawaii swordfish production declined"--Executive summary.

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