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Movement and surfacing behavior patterns of loggerhead sea turtles in and near Canaveral Channel, Florida : (September and October 1981)
  • Published Date:
    1983
Filetype[PDF - 3.39 MB]


Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Southeast Fisheries Center (U.S.), Mississippi Laboratories, ; Southeast Fisheries Center (U.S.) ;
  • Series:
    NOAA technical memorandum NMFS-SEFC ; 112
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    "As part of a larger effort involving trawling and aerial surveys of loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) in the Canaveral Channel and vicinity, a radio and acoustic tracking study of these animals was conducted over a 20-day period (September 19 to October 8, 1981). Primary emphasis was to determine if tracking approaches would provide information relevant to tactical manage- ment of dredging and sea turtle recovery programs for the channel. Loggerhead sea turtles are listed as threatened species under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Little information exists on tracking techniques for sea turtles (summarized by Timko and DeBlanc, 1981). This meant a major portion of the tracking study had to be directed at development and evaluation of approaches and procedures for monitoring movement patterns of these animals. Recent successes with radio tracking studies of juvenile turtles (Timko and DeBlanc, 1981) provided most of the initial guidance augmented by information from satellite tracking studies in the northern Gulf of Mexico (Timko and Ko1z, 1982). Besides radio and acoustical tracking, an experimental effort was conducted to continuously monitor surfacing behavior patterns of the turtles to provide information both for guiding future tracking studies and for extrapolating aerial sea turtle counts to estimates of population size"--Introduction.

  • Supporting Files:
    No Additional Files