| Expanding conservations/sediment control practices in priority farm areas of the Guánica Bay : final comprehensive report - :16075 | Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP)
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Expanding conservations/sediment control practices in priority farm areas of the Guánica Bay : final comprehensive report
  • Published Date:
    2016
Filetype[PDF-13.81 MB]


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Expanding conservations/sediment control practices in priority farm areas of the Guánica Bay : final comprehensive report
Details:
  • Personal Authors:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Protectores de Cuencas ; United States, National Ocean Service, ; Coral Reef Conservation Program (U.S.)
  • Description:
    "Historically, the Guánica Bay area was associated with some of the most extensive and healthy reef complexes in Puerto Rico. Unfortunately, coral reefs worldwide have experienced an unprecedented decline over the past 30-40 years, some estimates suggest that in the Caribbean we have lost more than 50% of live coral and over 90% of sensitive and federally listed Acropora palmata (elkhorn) and Acropora cervicornus (staghorn) species. Meanwhile studies by scientists in Puerto Rico have shown that nutrients and sediment contaminants have increased by 5-10 times pre-colonial levels and several times in the last 40-50 years (Ortiz-Zayas et. al., 2006). 'Coral reefs of Puerto Rico are among the most highly threatened Caribbean reef systems' (Ramos-Scharrón, 2010; Burke and Maidens, 2004). The U.S. Coral Reef Task Force determined that reducing the contribution from land-based sources of sediment was essential in maintaining the long-term stability of coral reefs (USCRTF, 2000). Even though most soils in Puerto Rico have a high to very high vulnerability to water erosion (Reich et al., 2001) and land erosion is recognized to pose a major threat to both freshwater and marine resources (Torres and Morelock, 2002; SolerLópez, 2001), limited actions are generally taken to mitigate its effects (Lugo et al., 1981)"--Introduction.

  • Document Type:
  • Funding:
    Funding: NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program, National Ocean Service,; grant number: NA15NOS4820072,; project number: 198;
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