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Complex quality control of rawinsonde heights and temperatures (CQCHT) at the National Meteorological Center
  • Published Date:
    1992
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Complex quality control of rawinsonde heights and temperatures (CQCHT) at the National Meteorological Center
Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    National Meteorological Center (U.S.)
  • Series:
    Office note (National Centers for Environmental Prediction (U.S.)) ; 390
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    "As is well known, some meteorological data received at prognostic centers can be distorted by so-called rough errors. Such errors may originate in the course of measurement, processing, or communicating the data. Although comparatively rare, rough errors may lead, particularly in data-poor regions to substantial errors in analyzed meteorological fields and, therefore, in predicted ones. That is why some special procedures are performed at every prognostic center both manually and automatically trying to get rid of rough errors. These procedures are usually referred to as the quality control (QC) of operational meteorological information. The necessity of an automatic QC performed by a computer was recognized at the beginning of the numerical weather prediction era (Gilchrist and Cressman, 1954), and the first such methods were proposed and applied soon after that (Bergthorsson and D66s, 1 955, Bedient and Cressman, 1957, Staff Members, Joint Numerical Weather Prediction Unit, 1 957). There was, however, little progress in improvement of QC methods during several following decades, just because the most important task was to improve existing prediction models and data assimilation systems, and also because the QC design was considered by many specialists as a purely technical task having nothing to do with science"--Introduction, paragraphs 1-2.

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