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The refrigerated shelflife of Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus maculatus) and king mackerel (Scomberomorus cavalla) harvested from the southeastern United States
  • Published Date:
    1982
Filetype[PDF - 1.43 MB]


Details:
  • Personal Authors:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Southeast Fisheries Center (U.S.), Charleston Laboratory. ; Southeast Fisheries Center (U.S.) ;
  • Description:
    Freshly caught Spanish mackerel (Scrnnberomorous maculatus) and king mackerel (Scomberomorous cavalla) were processed into various market forms and stored, either iced or packaged, at 4°C. Representative samples of each product form were removed from storage at regular intervals and assessed for quality using organoleptic, microbial and chemical methods. The resultant shelf1ife of Spanish mackerel, after processing,° was 9 days for gutted, as well as for headed and gutted (H&G) fish (iced) and 5-6 days for tray-pack skin-on and skinless fillets (4°C). The resultant shelflife of king mackerel was 15 days for whole fish (iced) and 9 days for portions (4°C). volatile nitrogen (TVN) and trimethylamine-nitrogen (TMA-N) values increased dramatically after 5 days of storage at 4°C for Spanish mackerel and 9 days at 4°C for king mackerel, and compared favorably with sensory scores. Thiobarbituric acid (TBA) values for king mackerel (whole fish and portions) increased fairly regularly with an increase in storage time. TBA values for all except one sample of the products examined during this study did not exceed 5 mg of malonaldehyde (MA)/kg of sample which has been suggested as the upper limit that can be present in fishery products without being detected by sensory panels. It was concluded that spoilage was due to microbial activity and not oxidative rancidity as indicated by low TBA values.

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