COVID-19, Food Insecurity, and Migration
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COVID-19, Food Insecurity, and Migration
  • Published Date:

    2020

  • Source:
    The Journal of Nutrition, Volume 150, Issue 11, November 2020, Pages 2855–2858, https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxaa270
Filetype[PDF-139.05 KB]


Details:
  • NOAA Program & Office:
  • Description:
    In this policy piece, we investigate the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-food-insecurity migration channel and develop a policy agenda. The interaction between COVID-19 and the drop in economic activity will lead to increased food insecurity within and across countries. Higher food insecurity may act as a multiplier for the epidemic due to its negative health effects and increased migration. Research has shown that food insecurity affects within-country and cross-border migration. Besides the mean prevalence rate, the distribution of food insecurity affects the migration decision. The impacts of COVID-19 are particularly strong for people in the lower tail of the food-insecurity distribution. In the current context, the effect of food insecurity therefore could be increased migration, including both rural-urban migration and international migration. Importantly, the crisis might lead to a structural break in migration patterns. People might avoid heavily affected COVID-19 destination countries (e.g., United States, Italy, or Spain) and move to other countries. Due to the persistent nature of migration flows, this could have long-lasting effects.
  • Pubmed ID:
    32840610
  • Pubmed Central ID:
    PMC7499649
  • Document Type:
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