| Ocean Today. Ocean science robots / contributors : Woods Hole Oceanographic institution; Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; University of Maine; Dalhousie University; Bedford Institute of Oceanography; Webb Research, Inc.; IFM-GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany - :15785 | Education and Outreach | National Ocean Service (NOS)
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Ocean Today. Ocean science robots / contributors : Woods Hole Oceanographic institution; Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; University of Maine; Dalhousie University; Bedford Institute of Oceanography; Webb Research, Inc.; IFM-GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany
  • Published Date:
    2011
Filetype[MP4-17.22 MB]


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Ocean Today. Ocean science robots / contributors : Woods Hole Oceanographic institution; Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey; University of Maine; Dalhousie University; Bedford Institute of Oceanography; Webb Research, Inc.; IFM-GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany
Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution ; Rutgers University ; University of Maine ; ... More ▼
  • Description:
    The video is part of the Ocean Today educational video collection (sub-collection: Exploration). It has open captions and can be viewed in regular (640 x 36) or high resolution (1280 x 720). Video's transcript: "In the waters off of Martha's Vineyard, the Office of Naval Research is using unmanned and robotic systems to investigate how sediments on the ocean floor are moved around by currents and waves. STEVE ACKLESON: Coastal storms often stir up sediments, creating a turbid layer of bottom water that can be difficult or impossible for Navy sensors and divers to see through. NARRATION: The problem is not easy to study using traditional ship-based approaches, so Navy scientists are developing and employing robotic observation systems. Some of these sampling systems are designed to monitor water column and ocean floor properties at fixed locations. The Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory, operated by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, is connected with cables to laboratories on shore where scientists can control the sensors and study ocean conditions as they occur. One advantage to this approach over ship-based studies is the ability of these robotic systems to operate during storms when it would be too difficult or dangerous for scientists to work at sea. Some of these robots are like small submarines that are able to move around under their own power. JONES: Gliders are an AUV, an autonomous underwater vehicle, and it's kind of unique in the AUV world in that most vehicles are driven by propellers, but gliders are actually using a buoyancy drive to create forward propulsion. So I view these AUVs or autonomous underwater vehicles such as the ocean glider as a complement to today's boats and other structures where they're enabling us to say, 'Okay, there's a place of interest that we'd like to go look at out here.' They're doing these border patrols or boundary patrols. NARRATOR: As these systems become more capable, they will provide future scientists with the tools to unlock secrets of how the ocean works and to understand processes that scientists today are only beginning to realize. It's truly an exciting time to be an oceanographer."

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