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Frost and temperature conditions in the cranberry marshes of Wisconsin
  • Published Date:
    1910
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Frost and temperature conditions in the cranberry marshes of Wisconsin
Details:
  • Corporate Authors:
    United States, Weather Bureau,
  • Series:
    United States. Dept. of Agriculture. Weather Bureau. [Document] ; no. 443
    Bulletin (United States. Weather Bureau : 1893) ; T
  • Document Type:
  • Description:
    "Cultivation of cranberries confined to three States.The cultivation of cranberries in the United States is confined mainly to three States-Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Wisconsin. In Massachusetts the cranberry-growing region in turn is limited almost entirely to the counties of Plymouth, Barnstable, and Bristol; in New Jersey, to Cape May, Atlantic, Gloucester, Burlington, Ocean, and Monmouth counties; and in Wisconsin, to Wood, Jackson, Juneau, and Monroe counties in the Wisconsin River Valley, and to Waushara and Winnebago counties in the Fox River Valley. (Fig. 1 for map of Wisconsin.) For several years there has been a marsh in the village of Cameron, Wis., and recently one was started in the Lake Superior region near the town of Ashland, Wis. The cultivation is slowly extending to Michigan and Minnesota and even Oregon, but the cultivated marshes in the three states last named are at present comparatively of no importance. There are, of course, wild cranberry marshes in several of the Northern States, but the berries picked therefrom are seldom sufficient to supply even local needs. They are of little consequence as compared with the fruit produced in the cultivated marshes of Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Wisconsin"--Introduction.

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